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DTD Handbook

Handbook for Damage Tolerant Design

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    • Sections
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Fundamentals of Damage Tolerance
      • 3. Damage Size Characterizations
      • 4. Residual Strength
      • 5. Analysis Of Damage Growth
      • 6. Examples of Damage Tolerant Analyses
      • 7. Damage Tolerance Testing
        • 0. Damage Tolerance Testing
        • 1. Introduction
        • 2. Material Tests
        • 3. Quality Control Testing
        • 4. Analysis Verification Testing
          • 0. Analysis Verification Testing
          • 1. Structural Parameter Verification Techniques
            • 0. Structural Parameter Verification Techniques
            • 1. Compliance
            • 2. Moiré Fringe
            • 3. Photoelasticity
            • 4. Crack Growth Rate
          • 2. Residual Strength Methods-Verification
          • 3. Crack Growth Modeling-Verification
        • 5. Structural Hardware Tests
        • 6. References
      • 8. Force Management and Sustainment Engineering
      • 9. Structural Repairs
      • 10. Guidelines for Damage Tolerance Design and Fracture Control Planning
      • 11. Summary of Stress Intensity Factor Information
    • Examples

Section 7.4.1.0. Structural Parameter Verification Techniques

The current analytical procedures for developing the stress-intensity factor (K) associated with two-dimensional structural geometries have been extensively verified.  The verification of the tools required to solve three-dimensional structural geometry problems, however, is still receiving major attention.  This subsection reviews the experimental techniques utilized to verify the analytical procedures for obtaining stress-intensity factors for two- and three-dimensional geometries.

For the two-dimensional crack geometries, the engineer has the opportunity to employ four different types of experimental tests to verify the stress-intensity factor solution for the given problem:  compliance (displacement/load) measurements [Bubsey, et al., 1973], moiré fringe techniques [Kiu & Ke, 1975], photoelastic procedures [Kobayashi, 1973], and crack growth rate testing [James & Anderson, 1969].  In the realm of the three-dimensional problem, only two of the above tests can be relied upon:  photoelastic procedures [Smith, 1975], and crack growth rate testing [Grandt & Sinclair, 1972; Grandt & Hinnerichs, 1974].